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Handicap Guidelines

RIVER STRAND GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

HANDICAP GUIDELINES


 

The handicap system was designed to make the game of golf more enjoyable by enabling players of differing abilities to compete on an equitable basis. With a handicap system as instituted by the USGA and supported by River Strand, a player can go anywhere and establish a fair and competitive game of golf. In order that a players handicap reflect their current playing ability, all home and away scores for both 9 and 18 hole rounds played must be entered. When a player plays a round alone they are not allowed to post a score.

Scores must be posted in a timely manner, preferably at the completion of play either on the computer in the Pro Shop or on your mobile device through the GHIN mobile app.

Options when posting scores are Home, Away and Tournament. A Tournament score is a score made in a competition organized and conducted by a Committee in charge of the competition. The competition can be match play or stroke play.

Scores from play during the 9 and 18 hole weekly men’s and women’s leagues at River Strand and Pro Shop/Club sponsored events will be posted by the Pro Shop. Any score that is to be posted as a Tournament will be posted by the Pro Shop. Thus, when posting scores on your own, it will either be Home or Away.

A player who starts, but does not complete a hole must record for handicap purposes the most likely score they would have made. The most likely score may not exceed the player's Equitable Stroke Control limit (see below). This most likely score should be preceded by an "X."

If a player does not play a hole or plays it other than under the Rules of Golf the score recorded for that hole for handicap purposes must be par plus any handicap strokes the player is entitled to receive on that hole. This hole score, when recorded, should be preceded by an "X."

To post a 9-hole score, the player must play 7 to 12 holes under the Rules of Golf; to post an 18-hole score, the player must play at least 13 holes under the Rules of Golf and follow the guidelines above for holes not played in completing the scores for the remaining holes not played.

Members who wish to play in Pro Shop/Club or Men’s/Women’s League sponsored events must maintain an active handicap, as defined by USGA and must secure a handicap from Florida State Golf Association through the River Strand Pro Shop.

All scores for handicap purposes, including Tournament scores, are subject to the application of Equitable Stroke Control. This mandatory procedure reduces high hole scores for handicap purposes in order to make handicaps more representative of a player's potential ability. Equitable Stroke Control is used when a player's actual or most likely score exceeds a maximum number, based on the table below, for the player's Course Handicap from the tees played.
 

 

 

 




 

Procedures for Penalty Scores and Adjustments to Handicap Index

Overview:

Handicap Index is earned. No player has an inherent right to a handicap index without providing full evidence of ability to the club’s Director of Golf, Pro, or handicap committee.

Penalty Score:

If a player fails to post an acceptable score in a timely manner, the handicap committee has 3 options:

1. Post the actual score made by player.

2. Post a penalty score equal to the lowest handicap differential in players scoring record.

3. Post actual score and a penalty score.

Handicap Index Adjustments

The handicap committee has the responsibility of making certain that each player has a handicap index that reflects potential ability. Below is a list of some circumstances that would make it necessary to adjust the payers index:

1. Player improves faster than system can react

Example: A player new to golf may being taking lessons, practices diligently and rapidly improves. The player’s scoring record may not exhibit potential ability.

2. Numerous “away” scores change index

If a player’s index increases by 3.0 or more due to posting “away” scores and the

subsequent scores indicate that the player’s increased index is too high, the

Committee must adjust the player’s index downward.
 

3. Temporary disability

An increased handicap may be given for a temporary disability. The modified

index must be identified by the letter “M” to indicate the modification by the

committee.
 

4. Player manipulation of round

Committee must adjust the handicap index of a player who manipulates scores.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

Posting erroneous scores.

Stopping play prior to 7 holes to avoid posting.

Deliberately taking extra strokes to inflate score.

Not adjusting scores under Equitable Stroke Control formula.

Procedures

  1. A letter will be submitted to the player notifying him/her of the handicap index adjustment.(Sample USGA letter attached).

  2. Before an adjustment becomes effective, the Handicap Committee must give the player an opportunity to explain the surrounding circumstances, either by appearing before the Committee or in writing.

  3. The Handicap Committee must determine how long a player’s index is to remain modified. At each revision date, the committee should compare the modified index to the “normal computation”.



 

Procedures for Penalty Scores and Adjustments

to Handicap Index

 

 

Overview:

Handicap Index is earned. No player has an inherent right to a handicap index without providing full evidence of ability to the club’s Director of Golf, Pro, or handicap committee.

 

Penalty Score

 

If a player fails to post an acceptable score in a timely manner, the handicap committee has 3 options:

1. Post the actual score made by player.

2. Post a penalty score equal to the lowest handicap differential in players scoring record.

3. Post actual score and a penalty score.

 

Handicap Index Adjustments

 

The handicap committee has the responsibility of making certain that each player has a handicap index that reflects potential ability. Below is a list of some circumstances that would make it necessary to adjust the payers index:

 

1. Player improves faster than system can react

Example: A player new to golf may being taking lessons, practices diligently and rapidly improves. The player’s scoring record may not exhibit potential ability.

 

2. Numerous “away” scores change index

If a player’s index increases by 3.0 or more due to posting “away” scores and the

subsequent scores indicate that the player’s increased index is too high, the

Committee must adjust the player’s index downward.

 

3. Temporary disability

An increased handicap may be given for a temporary disability. The modified

index must be identified by the letter “M” to indicate the modification by the

committee.

 

4. Player manipulation of round

Committee must adjust the handicap index of a player who manipulates scores.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

Posting erroneous scores.

Stopping play prior to 7 holes to avoid posting.

Deliberately taking extra strokes to inflate score.

Not adjusting scores under Equitable Stroke Control formula.
 

Procedures

 

  1. A letter will be submitted to the player notifying him/her of the handicap index adjustment.(Sample USGA letter attached).

  2. Before an adjustment becomes effective, the Handicap Committee must give the player an opportunity to explain the surrounding circumstances, either by appearing before the Committee or in writing.

  3. The Handicap Committee must determine how long a player’s index is to remain modified. At each revision date, the committee should compare the modified index to the “normal computation”.